Monday, August 11, 2008

Hawksley - little happy things

Although I have yet to find more on the elusive Englishman who came to New Brunswick, married Mary Goodwin, and produced 4 children with her in Fredericton (John Goodwin Hawksley, Mary Hawksley, Sarah Brown Hawksley, and Margaret Elizabeth Hawksley), I DO have a letter from England regarding the surname.

As a volunteer for NEHGS, my name goes in their annual report. This person saw my name and wrote to inquire after a family connection. Even though I can only tell her what little I know (that the Hawksley ancestor did come from England to New Brunswick, and his first son was born in Fredericton in 1810), it does feel nice to have received the letter. You never know when a person may turn out to be a very good new friend.

I have been focused very much on the Hawksley side lately. I've tried to glean clues from naming patterns (Isabel is EVERYWHERE, and I think that Mary Goodwin's mother - a "Workman" - is either an Isabel, Elizabeth, or Sarah Workman; likewise, I believe her father is a James Goodwin).

I've tried to glean information from Loyalist sites, but there is nothing that pertains to this family (Mr. Goodwin was a Loyalist from NJ or NY, and settled in St. John, New Brunswick; he was a POW at one point, but escaped).

Last, but not least, I've tried to find information on British soldiers of the Revolution and War of 1812. Thus far, I can't find online muster rolls. I expect this will require a trip to Fredericton, which I am simply not prepared to make this year. (My husband will be in Korea; my son is 5, and I just can't imagine him sitting quietly as I search records and cemeteries.)

Alas, our move to Alaska will take us farther away from New Brunswick. However, I will do my best to keep researching via the net and regular mail, until I have exhausted my options!

Saturday, August 9, 2008

What to do with old book?

I have an Arlington Edition "Grimm's Fairy Tales" with a blue cover and silver lettering on the spine, from circa 1893 (based on the advertisement in the back).

It is in very rough shape. The pages are frail and yellowed, and the binding is completely pulled away from the pages. The book can not be read, but a collector might appreciate it. Maybe it can even be repaired or preserved in some way. Who knows...

Any thoughts on what I ought to do with this crumbling, 115 year old tome?

Thursday, August 7, 2008

Alaska in '09

We are moving and it will be Anchorage, Alaska at the end of 2009. I'll have to keep up with long-distance genealogy from there!

Meanwhile, I am getting "The Bartlett Line" out this week. I tried a new experiment with it - I printed the first page in color on about half of the newsletter. I'm curious if it will get positive or negative feedback.